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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,028 (some duplicates have been removed)
optimizing the public transport. if you know how many people work in an area and you know where they live, it is much easier to negotiate a direct line for public transport. what we also did we organized a bureau that was helping companies, and also smaller companies, by making mobility part of their common sense of how to organize their own organization. this whole program cost about $130 million. about one-quarter of it was paid by the employers, two-thirds is paid by the local authorities, and the employers have also cost for their own organization. what are the benefits? the benefits are, in the organization, cutting costs. you do not have the cost of the parking lot. you can have less office space the case you have many people working from home. also quite interesting, in the netherlands, it is even a way to attract young talent because young talent nowadays does not want to work from 9:00 until 5:00, 6:00. they want to choose themselves when they work and where they work. with the home working, they can decide themselves when, where, and how they work, and most important as they do
economic stimulus by building facilities like this and putting people to work to do that job. ball the folks out here in the hard hats are also supported by people in the office is doing the processing, doing accounting, doing the bookkeeping, so there is a multiple in terms of jobs that are created because of programs like we have established. it was error, we were less than 50%. when i first w6urw@8yyixorwakñwe were roughly 35% effective, which was pretty impressive. it was higher than almost any other big city in this country, but we had an= reaching 50%, and they said it could not be done. we said we would reach 70%, and i was so proud when we broke 72%, and here we are with a goal of 75% by 2010, and not only did we achieve that. as i just region, we are at 77%. on our way -- ahead of schedule in fact, to be at 0 waste by 2020. there is no city that i know of anywhere in the world that could ever even imagine within the next number of years to be at zero ways. this is achievable because think about this -- even though we are at 77%, the remaining trash that comes here that en
, and as i said, it also creates jobs. it has been the result of a lot of people working together, but i do need to thank the speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who worked hard to make this program a reality, and we would not be here today except for her efforts. on behalf of american cities, i want to thank the speaker for her commitment and diligence. without her help, as i said, this would not be here. i also want to thank president obama and his administration for his support of the program as well as the american recovery and reinvestment act, which is also to fund a number of new initiative projects in a number of our cities. as i said, we are here to work for efficiency and reduce our carbon footprint. in my city, we are investing about $4 million to accelerate private city efforts to reduce energy efficiency in our city structures as well as some of our residential buildings, and we will hear in a moment from the mayors of other cities about what they're doing, but this program is exactly what we need to continue. it is really the only major funding source we have to be able to imp
partnerships. it is also the public partnerships. it is about getting people to work and reducing anxiety and stress, creating opportunity and building the future of this city by focusing on investing in people and place. i am very grateful that you all took the time to be here. i see you wait too many commissioners to even mention them. -- i see way to mano many commissioners to even mention them along with department heads. i want to thank all of those assembled, family members in particular, for taking the time to come down. we're making a number of new appointments. we are making some reappointment. one that i cannot hesitate to or should not -- john newland and i go way back. i somehow became the president of the commission, i still do not know how that happened. newland came in to replace a former director and took over the show down there. he was running things, dpt for some time. i got to know john. somehow, i became mayor. i thought he was a great person to get back on the mix and was very honored that john decided to take the entertainment commission post. i beat him up a lot, t
this program. the idea in san francisco was threefold. first would be to get people back to work, which this program has done with a wild success. the second is to help businesses small and large to either maintain or grow during this time of economic recession, and last is to stimulate the local economy, which we have done through the wages. $55 million in wages are projected to be reimbursed through the end of september of this year, and that is money going right back into the local economy. arguably one of the biggest successes of the federal stimulus act is this program nationally. today, what we want to announce, and the mayor will take the lead on this, is a new campaign or a final push to get the federal government to act to extend this program. $2.5 million will extend it for another year. we will keep the 3000 people who have been employed in san francisco through this program on the job. the last day of august, we had to suspend our program. we are no longer enrolling new employees. we are no longer enrolling new employers. for us, we are at the status quo. we have a month lef
raising the retirement age ask why you would want to do that, we have many people out of work. those are take home points. the policy questions that i want to touch on also are, and i will answer them quickly, because entitlement age changes have disproportionate impact on at risk populations? absolutely. that will be discussed further. should the retirement age be raised further? no, we have this grand experiment or not so grand experiment in place, the age of eligibility has been raised to age 66 and is moving up to 67 by roughly 2027. here is a piece that we are discussing but i want to add into this discussion. should the age of first eligibility for social security be raised? should the early eligibility age which has remained at 62 go up to 65? here is an interesting issue. the arguments are -- they come from two angles pretty positive argument is we want to send a message that people should work longer. that is probably true, by the way. we should send that message that this may not be the right way to send that message. people should work wonder if they can end of the 12. two
hearings are about budget cuts. having worked in san francisco with homeless people who have psychiatric illness since 1988, i have watched the system dismantle itself. i have watched to be dismantled every 38 or four years, each time a new administration comes in. -- i have watched the system be dismantled every three or four years, each time a new administration comes in. i could give a history of what has happened in san francisco since 1966 as a result of institutional nation. i have strong views on the legislative aspects of what you are talking about, including laura's law. started my non-profit because of his tired of what the publ department of public health was not doing. you cannot tell us there is no money in the city. there is a lot of money in the city. we provide services to perhaps 100 people a year for as long as 10 years or however long they need it. the doctors and psychiatrists we use volunteer their time. we probably under-pay our staff. that is fine. they're very devoted to what they do. the cost per client, per year is $3,500. conversely, it costs $34,000 to incarce
will work for anyone in the country. >> we send people to the dry waller the carpenters and the plummers. >> we are conscious who we give a job referral to. >> we look at the skills part as far as hayou do with a hammer and nail there are other components to be able to be a team player. be able to take directs and be precise and punctual things like this you need to help you keep your jobs. >> we will looking at the interviews today and doing the critiquing from the papers. >> i was thinking last week we were talking ask that was so much thinking going on about the interview and how i was going to do it. >> i feel like, me, as an african-american woman and older woman with children i feel i have to set an example. a lot of people don't know how to deal with anger and conflicts. the kids here look up to me. if i do something and don't set an example then they are going to follow. since i've been a positive roll model, coming to school everyday. some of those kids pick up on that and i see the improvement in them. >> one thing that i knew but the class helped reinstate is that you ha
people in the trenches receive $447 a week to work. let me repeat that -- we can hand out $450 a week not to work, or 470 -- $447 a week to work. we can hand out $447 a week to work for those that needed the most -- people with kids -- that benefit those that need those employees the most -- small business -- to go out and create wealth and opportunity and stimulate our economy. it does not get much better than that. it is beyond mesmerizing, and it goes to my frustration with the extraordinary lack of leadership in this country right now on this issue of jobs, the rhetoric aside, the lack of leadership that the fundamental fact has been ignored by elected officials. this should, more than anything else, drive people through the roof. you could pay people to work, or you could pay people not to work. if you pay people to work, and by the way, none of the folks you see right here want unemployment benefits. they all spoke eloquently when they were here, and that is just a small sampling of thousand- plus families represented right there are people who want to keep their jobs that do no
. >> if they aren't drawing on th walls and doing it on the glass walls of people's businesses. >> and working class and the character of the mission and th mom and pop streets and feel like your in latin america. >> and it's a drug dealing center and no man's land and anybody can deal the drugs. >> i like the community spirit here and the diversity and i wa accepted a gay man. >> and it's been a parolee dumping ground and we release them with no supervision. >> this neighborhood has a history of fighting for social injustice. >> at the end of may we have a incredible festival and the biggest ethnic event and carnival san francisco and bri brings the biggest festival on the west coast and the art's community at its finest that d day. >> welcome to san francisco's district nine, a land of great beaty and conflicts and transactions and and drunks and bangers and old timers and junkies and *erbgs tende tend e look for housing and a place to park and this is much of the mission area and today's show will focus on the mission and let's look at the district's young people and efforts to kee kids out of tr
for generations. there's probably 20 people that are in her family with all her sisters that work or have worked at joey's. these people are san francisco. just like the giants season ticket holders. these people have been here. she has run clubs. she made all five of bill graham's clubs. hired and fired every waitress. every time i've got to joey's, there's two guys standing outside. she has had a lease one year at a time for 16 years. and yet she spent over a half million dollars on your property. i'm in commercial real estate. we can all do the math. divide it by 12%. that's the money. i don't know about the types. i'm not aware of all that. but certainly i'll review it. and no doubt, tragedy is tragedy. but that has nothing to do. that's outside. we go and walk over and see giants, whatever venues, whatever is going on with the venue. when you have that big of an expansion, what are you going to shoot? the people are going to come to an open area. they said two guys showed up, a guy was drawn out, so he had nothing to do. they don't recognize -- they didn't recognize who the guy was. it wasn
accomplished. there are people in place who are ready to start working on this project tomorrow. forcing any type of further delay would leave a gutted property and blight on kearny street in chinatown. the planning department has overseen a vigorous environmental analysis, and the 605 kearny street development team has fully worked with city officials during this project. extraordinary efforts have been made to follow the guidelines of the city planning department and dbi. the time it took to obtain the building permits, to get everything in place was well worth the effort, and we are requesting the board allow this project to move forward without delay. thank you. >> thank you. commissioners, the matter is before you. commissioner fung: i am sure everybody in the audience recognizes that i could speak for hours if we were to discuss the nature of ethnic enclaves, the nature of chinatown. many of us have been in that very discussion, such as myself, since the early 1970's. the issue before us is relatively narrow, but it has wide ranging impact. i think i would share with my fellow commissi
of people out of work. >> you institute a hiring freeze. you don't fire people. you let government get smaller. >> we have been talking about that. >> people talk about it. doing it is another thing. >> every single member of congress seems to be invested in the defense industry. as soon as you are elected, you will find a way over to lockheed martin. they will find a way to do. quite the defense industry is reducing itself. >> traditional wisdom holds that the republicans will pick up seats in the coming elections. what do they do after they get the seats? do they get back to where bush was? how do things change? what would be different? i think they will make substantial gains. >> you are looking at a different type of republican. i have met many republican candidates running for office at all levels. they are not what you would call typical republicans. they are economic conservatives. they are very with that. they are determined to do what is right for the country, like paul ryan, for example. he set the tone for what this new group of republicans is going to be like. people refer
the past. you know. went to school with. people that you work with at other jobs. military or something. kind of weird. it's a small word, you be. like i said, what do people do when they come to san francisco? they ride a cable car. >> california line starts in the financial district. people are coming down knobbhill. the cable car picks people up. takes them to work. >> there still is no other device to conquer these hills better than a cable car. nobody wanted to live up here because you had to climb up here. with the invention of the cable car, these hills became accessible. he watched horses be dragged to death. cable cars were invent in san francisco to solve the problem with it's unique, vertically challenged terrain. we are still using cars a century old >> the old cable car is the most unique thing, it's still going. it was a good design by then and is still now. if we don't do something now. it's going to be worse later. >> the cable cars are built the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it
with this economy, but they have to be large enough to embrace the future. we have to put people to work in a way that will embrace the future 30 years from today. that is what this project does. that was the house and aren't. then we have to go to the senate. [laughter] i just want to make sure you knew what i was talking about. and then barbara boxer had to go through and explain we are not building for today, this is for tomorrow. yes, we will put the shovels in the ground, we will put people to work now, but we have to address the future, the problems that the mayor addressed, the governor and legislature talked about. that brings us here today, her success, and that is how we have to address this to get the nation moving again. it is very exciting to work with speaker pelosi, senator boxer, senator feinstein on these huge projects. we have always believed california is on the cutting edge. being here in this great city with this great leadership is once again the proof that we are on the cutting edge. thank you for the vision of the transportation secretary as well for recognizing that. [app
. >> it does work and it does pay off. so the people who are connected get the goodies. >> that is right and that is what happens in a big government society. >> most people like getting free stuff. >> yes. >> i think more and more people in america are beginning to wake up to the fact that this thing is coming unglued. >> when the healthcare bill was close to passage, ryan took on the government directly. >> this bill does not control costs. this bill does not reduce deficits. >> there is strong disagreements on the numbers here, paul. >> the president smiled and they took hands but came no where close to agreeing. >> trillions in obligations that we have no means to pay for. >> why are your colleagues saying it is okay to spend more? are you saying they are stupid or don't care or are pandering for votes? >> they believe that the government should be far larger and far big. >>> stop spending so much. >> that is something you should tell the republicans, john. >> democratic congressman rob andrews is a friend of paul ryan. he says don't blame us. >> president regan and both president bu
star from tarp, from sfpd, people that actually work directly with our families who are in crisis. so this is an opportunity for you to see who the people are that are touching our students when you let us know that they need to be touched. so this is really an opportunity for all of our merchants to see what we're putting in behind this effort. so without further ado, i want to welcome our superintendent of schools. our first week of school went off without a hitch, thank goodness. and the efforts that he's been doing around truancy and the support he's been giving and receiving to the city to make sure our students stay in school. superintendent carlos garcia. [applause] >> good morning. for me, it's like a dream come true. i have to tell you. i've been a superintendent in three other places before i came here, and finally my dream has come true. we have a mayor who is actually walk tk talk, stepping up and saying what we need to do is if this isn't just a school district problem. this isn't just a parent problem. this is really a community, a city, county problem. it's everybody's
, being there several times a week. we have our people working to increase attendance. there are just little things that were slipping through the cracks that had not been identified. that is the beginning stages. then there is the professional development. we are developing ways of doing zoned professional development. we are reaching all of the teachers and not just a school of teachers. >> some tangible ways you might feel or observe the difference is parents will be much more thoroughly engaged about understanding what expectations are for learning in the classroom grade to grade, quarter to quarter, and have clear measures for understanding how their students are doing. in the classroom, you might see a second teacher during the lift receive block, either providing demonstration lessons and, working on a specific strategy, providing intervention support using tailored curriculum materials with a set group of students. you might see partners and coaches working with grade level teams and instructional leadership teams as well as the principal in defining their action plan. our nei
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,028 (some duplicates have been removed)